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Faculty

Namesort descending Department Research Description Current Student
E. Dale Abel, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for cardiac failure in diabetes; Elucidating the molecular signals that coordinate the mitochondrial and metabolic adaptations to cardiac growth; Elucidating the mechanisms by which insulin and growth factor signaling regulate cardiac mitochondrial function and the adaptation of the heart to stress; Elucidating the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, diabetes and its complications. Rebecca Autenried
Ted Abel, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychological & Brain Sciences
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neuroscience & Pharmacology
Research in the Abel lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms of memory storage and the molecular basis of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. We use mouse models to examine the role of molecular signaling pathways as well as transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in defining how neural circuits mediate behavior.
Christopher Adams, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle atrophy Therapeutic interventions for skeletal muscle atrophy, obesity and type 2 diabetes Matthew Miller
Christopher Ahern, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Function and pharmacology voltage-gated sodium channels that drive the rapid upstroke of the action-potential throughout the body. Colin Clark
Bryan Allen, MD, PhD
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Understanding the basic science mechanisms by which pharmacological ascorbate can selectively act as a pro-oxidant in brain and lung cancer vs. normal cells
Lee-Ann Allen, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
Phagocyte biology with a particular focus on interactions of pathogenic bacteria with macrophages and neutrophils Joseph Vecchi, M3G is doing a 2019 Summer Rotation with Dr. Allen. Joseph Vecchi
Michael Anderson, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Physiological properties of the eye and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying a variety of complex eye diseases including glaucoma. Glaucoma typically involves three types of events: molecular insults compromising the anterior chamber, increased intraocular pressure, and neurodegenerative retinal ganglion cell loss. Carly van der Heide
James Ankrum, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
My lab utilizes biomaterials and drug delivery strategies to influence the fate and function of cells both in vitro and in vivo. My long-term goal is to engineer enhanced cell-based and -inspired therapeutics to restore function to diseased and damaged tissues. Lauren Boland
Sheila Baker, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Cellular and molecular mechanisms of membrane protein trafficking in vertebrate photoreceptors.
Alex Bassuk, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Brittany Todd, M1G and Maddie Mix, M2G will do 2019 summer rotations in Dr. Bassuk's lab. /// Congenital defects of the nervous system, especially neural tube defects, familial epilepsy, neurogenetics, neural stem cell biology Our laboratory is interested in understanding the basic mechanisms underlying both normal and disordered development of the nervous system. Our approach to these issues includes investigating the genetics of human neural tube defects (NTDs) and familial epilepsies, and elucidating the biology regulating neural stem cell development. Lindsay Agostinelli, Lucy Evans
Gail Bishop, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Our particular areas of current focus are in lymphocyte signaling and interactions between innate and adaptive immune receptors. The following is a summary of key projects ongoing in the lab – 1) How does TRAF3 regulate survival uniquely in B lymphocytes? How can this information be used to select more effective treatments for B cell malignancies?; 2) What is the role of TRAF3 in signaling and function of T cells?; 3) B lymphocytes as immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. Tina Arkee, Amy Whillock
Aaron Boes, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Our laboratory is interested in the link between brain structure and function across the lifespan, particularly network-based localization of neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We approach this topic using multi-modal neuroimaging methods that include lesion mapping, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and structural MRI.
Charles Brenner, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory is engaged in several projects that dissect specific problems in the metabolic control of gene expression. In particular, we are interested in how changing environmental conditions lead to reversible transfer of two carbon, i.e. acetyl, and one carbon, i.e. methyl, groups to proteins and DNA, respectively.
Gordon Buchanan, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Research efforts in the Buchanan laboratory are focused on understanding basic mechanisms of epilepsy and sleep-wake regulation. We are particularly interested in the effects of seizures and vigilance state on cardio-respiratory control and how these may interact to lead to death following a seizure, or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Our goal is to understand factors that render a given seizure fatal in an effort to help prevent SUDEP. Fillan Grady
Andrean Burnett, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Our laboratory seeks to enhance the treatment of head and neck cancer by improving radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens for recurrent and metastatic disease. We focus in particular on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the increasing use of EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Our overall goals are to increase the anti-tumor efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in head and neck tumors, and identify mechanisms of resistance to EGFR-based chemotherapy.
Kevin Campbell, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Cancer Biology
Research in my laboratory is focused on two main topics: the mechanism of muscular dystrophies and development of therapeutic strategies to treat muscular dystrophy. Ameya Walimbe
Joseph Cavanaugh, PhD
  • Biostatistics
  • Informatics
Model selection, time series analysis & modeling diagnostics Elliot Burghardt
Mary Charlton, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Cancer Biology
Health services epidemiology, Cancer surveillance and epidemiology, Assessment of differences in access and health services use between rural and urban populations related to the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer Kristin Weeks
Elizabeth Chrischilles, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Pharmacy - Pharmacy Practice & Science Dept (PPS)
  • Pharmacy - Health Services Research Division (PPS - HSR)
  • Cancer Biology
  • Informatics
Economic evaluation of chronic disease therapies; medication use and effects among the elderly
Sanjana Dayal, PhD, FAHA
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
Delineating mechanisms of thrombosis associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cancer
Kris DeMali, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Dermatology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
A major focus of the work in my lab is to understand cellular mechanisms involved in assembly and maintenance of cell-cell adhesions by examining the function and regulation of proteins recruited to the cytoplasmic face of cadherins. Miranda Schene
Rebecca Dodd, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The Dodd lab studies soft-tissue sarcomas, a type of cancer that develops in connective tissue such as muscle, nerves, fat, or tendons. Specific areas of research include 1) the genetics of sarcoma, 2) the tumor microenvironment, 3) preclinical platform applications, and 4) novel genome editing tools. Wade Gutierrez
Ayotunde Dokun, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Molecular Medicine
How does diabetes interact with genetics and contribute to the poor outcomes in individuals with peripheral arterial disease (PAD)?
Martine Dunnwald, PharmD, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
My research interests involve skin, epidermal development and regeneration, and orofacial clefts. We are currently investigating the idea that palatal development and cutaneous wound healing accomplish the common anatomic need, to close a hole and form a seam, using common genes and pathways.
Adam Dupuy, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Pathology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
The goal of my current research is to understand the role that somatic mutation plays in all aspects of tumor biology. Much of our work has made use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system to engineer mouse cancer models in which somatic mutations are generated by transposon insertions. The current work in my laboratory focuses on the genetics of hepatocellular carcinoma and T-cell leukemia.
John Engelhardt, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Research in the Engelhardt laboratory focuses on: 1) lung molecular and cellular biology as it relates to the pathogenesis and treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, 2) the development of viral vector for gene therapy and gene editing, 3) pathogenesis cystic fibrosis related diabetes, and 4) the study of airway stem cell niches, the regulatory mechanisms that control stem cell proliferation and repair in the airway, and the development of cell-based therapies for CF using stem cells.
John Fingert, MD, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
My laboratory is currently investigating the mechanisms by which defects in genes in the autophagy pathway (TBK1, OPTN, and others) lead to normal tension glaucoma using transgenic mice, induced pluripotent stem cells, and other patient-based studies. Other major projects include genetic studies of pigmentary glaucoma, exfoliative glaucoma, dominant optic atrophy, and studies of the genetic basis of quantitative features of glaucoma (eye pressure, corneal thickness, and optic nerve cupping). Carly van der Heide
Ernesto Fuentes, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Research in my laboratory focuses on important problems in signal transduction and potentially gain insight into the mechanisms governing signal transduction in eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems. The major goal is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate signal transduction.
Joel Geerling, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Identifying and deciphering previously unknown connections between neurons in the brainstem and other subcortical brain region Fillan Grady
Pamela Geyer, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
The Geyer laboratory is interested in understanding mechanisms involved in genome organization and gene regulation. Studies include determination of the molecular mechanisms used by insulators to prevent interactions between enhancers, silencers and promoters and the identification of novel insulators.
Joseph Glykys, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
The long-term goals of the Glykys Lab are: 1) To better understand how the brain inhibitory system works at the cellular level. 2) To better understand how the dysfunction of the inhibitory system leads to seizures, especially in the neonatal period. 3) Find approaches to enhance the inhibitory system to better treat seizures, especially neonatal seizures.
David Gordon, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
2020 summer rotation mentor.
Jeremy Greenlee, MD
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
I study human language, audiovisual, and vocalization physiology using electrophysiological recordings from human subjects undergoing surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy. Ryan Kelley
Isabella Grumbach, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The Grumbach lab studies Calcium- and reactive oxygen species-dependent pathways in smooth muscle and endothelium that contribute to vascular wall disease, for example in hypertension, atherosclerosis and after mechanical or chemical injury.
C. Allan Guymon, PhD
  • Chemical & Biochemical Engineering
Current research projects: 1) Photopolymerization of Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Systems; 2) Improving 3D Photocured Systems; 3) Improving Neural Interfaces by Directing Nerve Growth with Photopolymerized Micropatterns; 4) Directed Network Structure Through Controlled Radical Photopolymerization; 5) Nano/MicroStructured Materials Obtained Using Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation (PhIPS) Ryan Horne
Donna Hammond, PhD
  • Anesthesia
  • Neuroscience & Pharmacology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
We are particularly interested in the role that inhibitory neurotransmitters, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or the endogenous opioid peptides, play in the modulation of nociceptive sensitivity at the level of the spinal cord and brainstem. Our results indicate that persistent pain can lead to long-term changes in the pharmacology and physiology of both the afferent pathways that convey pain, as well as the efferent pathways that suppress pain.
Marlan Hansen, MD
  • Otolaryngology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Cancer Biology
  • Informatics
Auditory neurobiology and response of the auditory nerve to injury, its regenerative capacity, and methods to ameliorate damage using in vitro and in vivo animal models and human subjects. Joseph Vecchi
John Harty, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Cancer Biology
Current projects in the lab: Basic immunology and imaging of CD8 T cell immunity to liver-stage malaria; CD4 T cell and antibody mediated immunity to blood-stage malaria; Basic immunology and imaging of cerebral malaria; Tissue resident memory CD8 T cell dynamics and protection from influenza virus infection of the lung; Impact of repetitive influenza exposure on generation and persistence of protective CD8 T cells; Regulating memory CD8 T cell differentiation through inflammatory cytokines. Mitchell LeFebvre, Maddie Mix
Eric Hoffman, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
In addition to continuing basic physiologic research of the lung, Dr. Hoffman has begun to apply single and multi-spectral multidetector row spiral CT imaging methodology to objectively follow human lung pathology and pathophysiology with a particular emphasis on inflammatory lung diseases.
Jon Houtman, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
T cell activation is critical for the ability of the human immune system to properly fight an infection by a pathogen. However, inappropriate or aberrant T cell induction drives the initiation and progression of numerous human diseases, including T cell lymphoma/leukemia, human malignancies, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, and transplant rejection. The goal of my laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanism of the formation of the multiprotein signaling complexes that occur after TCR and to investigate the ability of therapeutic agents to alter TCR signaling. Aline Sandouk
Chou-Long Huang, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Nephrology
  • Molecular Medicine
Epithelial ion transport in physiology and kidney disease.
Nitin Karandikar, MD, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The goal of our research is to understand immune interactions that underlie the pathogenesis and regulation of immune-based diseases. A major focus of the laboratory is the immune-mediated, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis (MS).
Julia Klesney-Tait, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Dr. Klesney-Tait’s research focuses on the role of the innate immune system in the regulation of inflammation as it impacts on the evolution of sepsis and the development of bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation. Jayden Bowen
Damian Krysan, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
The Krysan lab is interested in understanding how pathogenic fungi cause disease; how the host defends itself against these fungal pathogens; and how to develop new therapies for human fungal diseases.
Amy Lee, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Otolaryngology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Our research centers on voltage-gated (Cav) Ca2+ channels and their roles in the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Joseph Vecchi
Steven Lentz, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Endothelial function in vascular diseases and tissue injury. Current areas of investigation include vascular function in hyperhomocysteinemia and atherosclerosis.
Kimberly Leslie, MD
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Molecular biology of hormone action and hormone receptors in reproductive tissues; response to steroid stimulation and the phenotypic and genomic mechanisms in endometrial cancer.
Scott Lieberman, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Immunology Graduate Program
The goal of our research is to understand the mechanisms of immune dysregulation that lead to organ-specific autoimmunity with a focus on Sjögren syndrome (lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity).
Dominique Limoli, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
Interactions between microbial species can have profound influences on health and disease. We seek to understand the cellular mechanisms driving these interactions in order to modulate polymicrobial community behavior and improve patient outcomes.
Barry London, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Genetics Graduate Program
My laboratory studies the molecular and genetic basis of sudden cardiac death in animal models, human families with inherited rhythm disorders, and populations at increased risk for sudden death. Pioneering studies in my laboratory engineered the first mouse models of long QT syndrome. Daniel Matasic, Alex Greiner
Vinit Mahajan, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
Currently at Stanford. Development of personalized medicine for eye diseases through translation of our discoveries in proteomics, genomics, and phenomics in humans, mice and tissue culture models. Gabriel Velez, Marcus Toral
Catherine Marcinkiewcz, PhD
  • Neuroscience & Pharmacology
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
In light of its complex role in human psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, the lab is currently investigating how environmental factors like stress, alcohol, and the use of antidepressant drugs can alter serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe and their efferent projections to stress and reward processing centers in the brain.
Wendy Maury, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
The goal of our research is to understand interactions between enveloped viruses and the host. We currently focus on two main areas of research: enveloped virus entry and innate host immune responses to virus infection. Using filoviruses and flaviviruses, we have identified a novel set of cell surface receptors and continue to explore the cellular biology of these interactions as well as the pathological consequences. Kai Rogers
Paul McCray, MD
  • Pediatrics - Pulmonary Allergy & Immunology
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Human Toxicology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
Our research interests include airway epithelial cell biology and the pathogenesis and treatment of the recessive disease cystic fibrosis. We are using large scale gene expression and genomics approaches to study epithelial cell mRNA and microRNA gene networks regulating biologic processes involved in health and disease. Laura Marquez Loza
Jacob Michaelson, PhD
  • Psychiatry - Computational & Molecular Psychiatry Division
  • Communication Sciences & Disorders
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Informatics
We are interested in the use of computing to improve the understanding, diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental conditions. 1) Genetics & comorbidities in Autism, 2) Genetics of language impairment, 3) Predictions of top autism gene candidates, 4) Genetics of twice-exceptionality. Leo Brueggeman
Nicholas Mohr, MD, MS
  • Anesthesia
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Epidemiology
The effect of telemedicine in emergency response and door-to-provider time. Morgan Bobb Swanson
Robert Mullins, MS, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
Biology and pathology of the choroidal microvasculature in aging and macular disease; Mechanisms involved in the development of drusen; Structural and compositional changes in Bruch's membrane in aging and disease, and their effects on ocular physiology; Animal and in vitro models of age-related macular degeneration; Cell biology of inherited retinal diseases. Drew Voigt, Nathaniel Mullin
Elizabeth Newell, MD
  • Pediatrics
2020 summer rotation mentor
Peggy Nopoulos, MD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Pediatrics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Our lab studies the structure and function of the brain using imaging tools such as MRI and cognitive / behavioral assessment. In the healthy brain we study topics such as brain development over the lifespan, gender differences and social cognition. Disease populations that we work with include patients with schizophrenia, Huntington's Disease, and children with clefts of the lip/palate.
Jacob Oleson, PhD
  • Biostatistics
Research interests include: Cochlear implant research; Speech and language learning; Infectious disease modeling; Air quality mapping; Small area estimation. Andres Dajles
Krystal Parker, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
My long-term goal is to understand the cerebellar contribution to cognitive and affective processes. In pursuit of this goal, I combine neurophysiology, pharmacology and optogenetics in animals performing behavioral tasks to dissect cerebellar neural circuitry. I study the potential for cerebellar stimulation to rescue cognitive impairments and mood in humans using EEG but also in animals with pharmacologically- and genetically-induced phenotypes of disease. My training in psychology, systems neurophysiology, and clinical psychiatry allows me to target the cerebellum for novel treatments of diseases involving cognitive and affective dysfunction.
Corinne Peek-Asa, PhD
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Informatics
Dr. Peek-Asa has conducted research in the areas of global road traffic safety, interpersonal violence, workplace violence, residential fire injuries, poisoning, and acute care. Her work has included surveillance; risk factor identification; design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention programs; design and evaluation of safety policy; and, translation and dissemination methods.
Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Pediatrics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
My laboratory has been interested in the pathogenesis of murine coronavirus infections for several years. Now, we also study three respiratory human coronavirus infections: SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)-coronavirus, Middle East Respiratory syndrome (MERS)-coronavirus, human coronavirus-OC43 and human coronavirus-NL63. Matthew Grunewald
Matthew Potthoff, PhD
  • Neuroscience & Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
Liver-derived hormones signal nutrient availability to other tissues and control substrate utilization to maintain energy balance. My lab is interested in unraveling these hepatic pathways that govern systemic energy balance by focusing on known and novel hepatokines. Sheps King-McAlpin
Veena Prahlad, PhD
  • Biology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
Using the models organism, C. elegans we investigate 1) how the sensory perception of suboptimal environmental conditions, or stress, is signaled by the nervous system; 2) how the signals are transmitted to non-neuronal cells; 3) how the information is interpreted by non-neuronal cells to to regulate protein folding and HSP gene.
George Richerson, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Molecular Medicine
Sudden death in epilepsy (SUDEP) and infants (SIDS), GABA mechanisms in epilepsy, Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, Control of breathing, Sleep, Serotonin, Brainstem mechanisms.
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  • No Rotation
Andrew Russo, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
My research interest is the molecular basis of a migraine. We have initiated translational studies to examine the unexpectedly high frequency of migraine and photophobia in veterans with mild TBI. Our overall goals are to develop effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for migraine and post-traumatic headaches.
Todd Scheetz, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioinformatics & Computational Biology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
  • Electrical & Computer Engineering
A major focus of my lab is the utilization and analysis of next-generation sequencing technology. We have identified two novel disease-causing genes to date, and are currently pursing validation in several additional families. Drew Voigt
Marin Schweizer, PhD
  • Internal Medicine
  • Epidemiology
Her research focuses on prevention and treatment of healthcare-associated infections, specifically S. aureus infections and surgical site infections; nasal decolonization and other interventions to prevent surgical site infections; molecular epidemiology of S. aureus; meta-analyses of these topics; and analyses of large databases to evaluate healthcare-associated infections.
Daniel Sewell, PhD
  • Biostatistics
  • Informatics
His primary area of research is in statistical models and inference for network data, and in particular the statistical analysis of dynamic social networks. He has also contributed to other subfields of statistics, such as clustering and particle filtering, and holds interest in broad research topic areas such as Bayesian statistics and statistical computation. He has worked collaboratively in the areas of infectious disease, exposure assessment, physical activity accelerometry data, analysis of large health claims databases, and in the area of healthcare team communication Elliot Burghardt
Val Sheffield, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics - Medical Genetics & Genomics
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Complex genetic disorders currently under investigation in the laboratory include hypertension, obesity, congenital heart disease and autism. In addition, we have worked on developing and improving techniques for disease mapping, positional cloning, and mutation detection. We have also had an active role in the human genome project and the rat genome project. Sunny Huang, Thomas Pak
Richard Smith, MD
  • Otolaryngology
  • Pediatrics
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
My laboratory focuses on inherited hearing impairment and complement-related renal diseases like membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (MPGN II; also known as Dense Deposit Disease) and atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome. Inherited hearing impairment can occur with other co-inherited clinical features to form a recognized phenotype (syndromic hearing loss) or appear in isolation (non-syndromic hearing loss). We are using RNAi to develop novel methods to correct hearing loss. Joseph Chin
Maria Spies, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
We study DNA repair at the most fundamental level by first deconstructing the macromolecular ensembles orchestrating distinct DNA repair events down to the level of individual proteins. By combining physical and single-molecule biochemistry, we then investigate molecular mechanisms of the key players in these DNA repair pathways and how other protein partners and posttranslational modifications affect their action.
Douglas Spitz, PhD
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
Nitric Oxide Toxicology, Glucose Deprivation-Induced Cytotoxicity in Human Tumor Cells Kelly Hubert
Hanna Stevens, MD, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Human Toxicology
Her research seeks to understand molecular and cellular aspects of early brain development and their relevance to psychiatric disorders. Her work is particularly focused on understanding how prenatal stress, environmental exposures and genes that play a role in early development have an impact on childhood behavior and act as risk factors for multiple psychiatric disorders.
David Stoltz, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Dr. Stoltz's research focuses on the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis related airway disease with a particular emphasis on studying airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, the role of paraoxonases (PONs) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing regulation, mucociliary clearance, and advanced airway imaging modalities and analysis.
Edwin Stone, MD, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Informatics
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Dr. Stone is interested in finding and characterizing genes that are involved in three classes of human eye disease: macular degeneration, glaucoma, and heritable photoreceptor degeneration. Matthew Miller
Eric Taylor, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Informatics
The Taylor Lab investigates the molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial function and their relationship to disease. We employ diverse experimental models as necessary to solve fundamental problems in metabolism. We have specific expertise in molecular genetics and metabolomics. We have ongoing projects on diabetes, cancer, and neuroscience. Daniel Pape
Michael Tomasson, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Understanding development of multiple myeloma and leukemia
Tina Tootle, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
In the Tootle Lab, we believe that if we want to target a particular action of prostaglandins, such as promoting heart health or preventing cancer, then we need to define the downstream targets of the specific prostaglandin signaling cascade that regulates those actions. To achieve this goal, we use the simple, yet elegant, system of Drosophila (fruit fly) genetics.
James Torner, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Informatics
Dr. Torner has conducted research in clinical trials, women’s health and disability related to injuries. He has been teaching, designing and conducting clinical trials for four decades. He has directed the Iowa Trauma Registry and has evaluated effective triage and critical care. Morgan Bobb Swanson
Budd Tucker, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
Dr. Tucker’s Laboratory is focused on combining state-of-the-art patient-specific stem cell, gene therapeutic and human retinal engineering technologies to study and treat inherited retinal degenerative blindness. Nathaniel Mullin
M. Todd Washington, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Washington's laboratory studies the mechanisms by which mutations occur in eukaryotic cells. We use a variety of approaches including biochemical studies (ligand binding studies, enzyme activity assays), structural biology (X-ray crystallography, X-ray scattering), and cell-based techniques (yeast genetics, human tissue culture) to understand the mechanisms of non-classical DNA polymerases and various replication accessory factors involved in mutagenesis. Melissa Gildenberg
Mary Weber, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
Rotation mentor summer 2020 Xavier Tijerina
George Weiner, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Sciences & Experimental Therapeutics Dept (PSET)
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Weiner’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies, and on development of novel approaches to immunotherapy of lymphoma. Shakoora Sabree
Michael Welsh, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Informatics
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
The Welsh laboratory emphasizes research in two main areas. The first is understanding the biology of cystic fibrosis, and developing new treatments. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the CFTR anion channel. Welsh and his colleagues are learning how the CFTR anion channel is regulated and how mutations disrupt its function. They also focus on the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease, learning how the loss of CFTR causes the bacterial airway infections and inflammation that destroy the lung. Andrew Kalenkiewicz, Akansha Jain
John Wemmie, MD, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
We recently found that the Acid Sensing Ion Channel, ASIC contributes to synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Our current research focuses on identifying the mechanism for ASIC activation in vivo, understanding the role of ASIC in synaptic plasticity, and establishing an uninterrupted link between ASIC channel activity and its behavioral impact. Margaret Fuller
Jan Wessel, PhD
  • Neuroscience Graduate Program
2020 summer rotation mentor.
Mary Wilson, MD
  • Internal Medicine
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Epidemiology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Dr. Wilson's research studies address the molecular, cellular and immunobiology of infection with the Leishmania species protozoa. Both human immunogenetic and parasite-encoded virulence factors lead to divergent disease manifestations. Dr. Wilson’s studies focus on the contributions of both host and parasite molecular characteristics that determine the outcome of leishmaniasis.
Li Wu, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Defining the mechanisms of HIV replication and understanding the role of immune cells and host factors that participate in the process are essential for developing effective strategies to eradicate HIV infection. Dr. Wu’s lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HIV replication, virus interaction with host factors and anti-HIV innate immunity.
Ling Yang, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Our research aims to identify the molecular components of integration between organelle stress responses that are in play in obesity and diabetes at the cellular and organismic levels. We are specifically interested in identifying the physiological causes of defective hepatic autophagy in obesity, and defining the molecular mechanisms underlying how autophagy, as a catabolic pathway, controls energy homeostasis in obesity-associated metabolic disorders.
Joseph Zabner, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Molecular Medicine
Dr. Zabner's research interests are in gene transfer to human airway epithelia in particular to develop gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Dr. Zabner also has an interest in the fluid composition of the airway surface liquid, and how it affects innate immunity. His clinical interests are in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.