Namesort descending Department Research Description Current Student
E. Dale Abel, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine
Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for cardiac failure in diabetes; Elucidating the molecular signals that coordinate the mitochondrial and metabolic adaptations to cardiac growth; Elucidating the mechanisms by which insulin and growth factor signaling regulate cardiac mitochondrial function and the adaptation of the heart to stress; Elucidating the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, diabetes and its complications. Rebecca Autenried
Ted Abel, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychological & Brain Sciences
  • Neuroscience
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Research in the Abel lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms of memory storage and the molecular basis of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. We use mouse models to examine the role of molecular signaling pathways as well as transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in defining how neural circuits mediate behavior.
Michael Abramoff, MD, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrical & Computer Engineering
Dr. Abramoff’s research has largely focused on assessing the performance of smart cameras enhanced with AI algorithms to detect signs of diabetic retinopathy. His findings led him to patent this technology and found a company, IDx, to bring patients a more accessible and affordable solution for the early detection of diabetic retinopathy.
Christopher Adams, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle atrophy Therapeutic interventions for skeletal muscle atrophy, obesity and type 2 diabetes
Christopher Ahern, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Function and pharmacology voltage-gated sodium channels that drive the rapid upstroke of the action-potential throughout the body. Colin Clark
Ferhaan Ahmad, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
He directs a laboratory conducting basic and translational research into the genetic and genomic mechanisms underlying inherited cardiovascular disorders, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage cardiomyopathy, inherited arrhythmias, and pulmonary hypertension. Mechanisms of pathogenesis of two Gram-negative bacteria - Helicobacter pylori and Francisella tularensis
Bryan Allen, MD, PhD
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
Understanding the basic science mechanisms by which pharmacological ascorbate can selectively act as a pro-oxidant in brain and lung cancer vs. normal cells
Lee-Ann Allen, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
Phagocyte biology with a particular focus on interactions of pathogenic bacteria with macrophages and neutrophils Joseph Vecchi, M3G is doing a 2019 Summer Rotation with Dr. Allen. Joseph Vecchi
Ethan Anderson, PhD
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Sciences & Experimental Therapeutics Dept (PSET)
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutics & Translational Therapeutics Division (PSET - PTT)
  • Pharmacy - Clinical Pharmaceutical Sciences (CPS)
  • Human Toxicology
  • Molecular Medicine
Research Areas: #1 - Cross-talk between Monoamines and Nutrient Metabolism in the Heart. #2 - Examining the Role of Reactive Aldehydes in Cardiac Remodeling with Diabetes and Aging. #3 - Elucidating the Metabolic and Anti-Inflammatory mechanisms of Mitochondrial Prohibitin (PHB).
Michael Anderson, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neuroscience
  • Genetics
Physiological properties of the eye and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying a variety of complex eye diseases including glaucoma. Glaucoma typically involves three types of events: molecular insults compromising the anterior chamber, increased intraocular pressure, and neurodegenerative retinal ganglion cell loss. Carly van der Heide
James Ankrum, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
My lab utilizes biomaterials and drug delivery strategies to influence the fate and function of cells both in vitro and in vivo. My long-term goal is to engineer enhanced cell-based and -inspired therapeutics to restore function to diseased and damaged tissues. Lauren Boland
Vladimir Badovinac, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Our long-term interest lies in elucidating the mechanisms that govern CD8 T cell responses after infection and/or immunization. We are interested in exploring the pathways that are involved in Ag-specific CD8 T cell homeostasis in vivo and exploring how the manipulation of these pathways can be used to facilitate the generation and maintenance of productive memory CD8 T cell responses in health and disease. We are also investigating the sepsis-induced state of immunoparalysis and exploring treatments to restore/improve immunity in sepsis survivors.
Sheila Baker, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Cellular and molecular mechanisms of membrane protein trafficking in vertebrate photoreceptors.
Kelly Baker, PhD
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
2019 Summer Rotation Research Mentor Sahaana Arumugam
Botond Banfi, MD, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Otolaryngology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Research in my laboratory focuses on two areas: (1) cystic fibrosis lung disease and (2) congenital inner ear defects leading to deafness and balance disorder.
Jason Barker, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
Dr. Barker's research focuses on interactions between the immune system and lipopolysaccharide, and important component of man medically important bacteria. In particular, he is interested in understanding how Francisella tularensis alters the structure of its lipopolysaccharide during growth in phagocytes.
Alex Bassuk, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Brittany Todd, M1G and Maddie Mix, M2G will do 2019 summer rotations in Dr. Bassuk's lab. /// Congenital defects of the nervous system, especially neural tube defects, familial epilepsy, neurogenetics, neural stem cell biology Our laboratory is interested in understanding the basic mechanisms underlying both normal and disordered development of the nervous system. Our approach to these issues includes investigating the genetics of human neural tube defects (NTDs) and familial epilepsies, and elucidating the biology regulating neural stem cell development. Lindsay Agostinelli, Lucy Evans
Christopher Benson, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology
Dr. Benson's research interests include the study of ion channels involved in sensation. We have focused on a class of ion channels called Acid-sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which play a role in responses to nociceptive, taste, and mechanical stimuli. We have discovered that ASICs are highly expressed in cardiac sensory neurons and we believe they are particularly important as pH sensors in the setting of myocardial ischemia.
Gail Bishop, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Our particular areas of current focus are in lymphocyte signaling and interactions between innate and adaptive immune receptors. The following is a summary of key projects ongoing in the lab – 1) How does TRAF3 regulate survival uniquely in B lymphocytes? How can this information be used to select more effective treatments for B cell malignancies?; 2) What is the role of TRAF3 in signaling and function of T cells?; 3) B lymphocytes as immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. Tina Arkee, Amy Whillock
Aaron Boes, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience
Our laboratory is interested in the link between brain structure and function across the lifespan, particularly network-based localization of neurological and psychiatric symptoms. We approach this topic using multi-modal neuroimaging methods that include lesion mapping, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and structural MRI. Kasra Zarei
Daniel Bonthius, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
Former UI faculty. Dylan Todd
Aaron Bossler, MD, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Bossler's research interest is in understanding the mechanisms and pathways which lead to oncogenesis particularly regarding the association of infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and the development of squamous cell cancer.
Ryan Boudreau, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
My laboratory studies post-transcriptional responses in diseased and developing heart and brain using viral vectors, mouse models, human tissues, and cell culture systems. Our goal is to identify disease-related RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) and determine their regulatory targets using computational and high-throughput biochemical means (HITS-CLIP, CLIP-seq).
Charles Brenner, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory is engaged in several projects that dissect specific problems in the metabolic control of gene expression. In particular, we are interested in how changing environmental conditions lead to reversible transfer of two carbon, i.e. acetyl, and one carbon, i.e. methyl, groups to proteins and DNA, respectively.
Gordon Buchanan, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
Research efforts in the Buchanan laboratory are focused on understanding basic mechanisms of epilepsy and sleep-wake regulation. We are particularly interested in the effects of seizures and vigilance state on cardio-respiratory control and how these may interact to lead to death following a seizure, or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Our goal is to understand factors that render a given seizure fatal in an effort to help prevent SUDEP. Fillan Grady
Noah Butler, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Our research is focused on understanding how the function of Plasmodium parasite-specific B cells and T cells are regulated during malaria. Our broader goals are to use this information to identify and develop new strategies to improve immunity against this globally important disease.
Kevin Campbell, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Cancer Biology
Research in my laboratory is focused on two main topics: the mechanism of muscular dystrophies and development of therapeutic strategies to treat muscular dystrophy. Ameya Walimbe
Ryan Carnahan, PharmD
  • Epidemiology
Neurobiology of aging and dementia; Patient-oriented research data analysis; Intermediate epi data analysis - SAS and R.
Joseph Cavanaugh, PhD
  • Biostatistics
Model selection, time series analysis & modeling diagnostics
Mark Chapleau, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neuroscience
Dr. Chapleau's research focuses on mechanisms of autonomic regulation in health and disease including effects of aging, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiomyopathy, myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure, and muscular dystrophy. Key hypotheses involve the roles of acid-sensing ion channels in sensory transduction, reactive oxygen species and angiotensin in sensory and sympathetic signaling, and oxidative stress in autonomic dysregulation.
Mary Charlton, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Cancer Biology
Health services epidemiology, Cancer surveillance and epidemiology, Assessment of differences in access and health services use between rural and urban populations related to the prevention, detection and treatment of cancer Kristin Weeks
Anil Chauhan, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Current research project includes: 1) Role of ADAMTS13-VWF axis in acute ischemic stroke and atherosclerosis. 2) Mechanistic role of fibronectin alternative splicing in early and advanced atherosclerosis.
Songhai Chen, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The broad goal of research in my lab is to define the function and regulation of heterotrimeric G proteins in leukocyte migration and tumor metastasis. The major focus of our research is to elucidate how G protein ß? subunits orchestrate the formation of specific signaling complexes to promote directional cell migration.
Betsy Chrischilles, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Pharmacy - Pharmacy Practice & Science Dept (PPS)
  • Pharmacy - Health Services Research Division (PPS - HSR)
  • Cancer Biology
Economic evaluation of chronic disease therapies; medication use and effects among the elderly Cole Haskins
John Colgan, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Immunology
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Asthma and other allergic reactions are triggered by excessive helper T cell responses to antigen; thus these cells are attractive targets for new therapeutics. We are employing molecular biology, protein-protein interaction analysis and retroviral gene delivery into T cells to dissect the functional relationship between CypA and Itk and its impact on downstream signaling pathways.
Robert Cornell, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Neuroscience
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Our work aims to dissect the gene regulatory networks that govern cell lineage specification, cell survival and cellular differentiation during embryonic development. In these studies we use zebrafish, a vertebrate model system well-suited to genetic and embryological methods.
Huxing Cui, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
Mapping the complicated network of neural circuits and uncover signaling mechanisms that control metabolic homeostasis and cardiovascular function.
Joseph Cullen, MD
  • Surgery
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States and is increasing in incidence. If we can rigorously demonstrate that the radiosensitization mediated by pharmacological ascorbate induces preferential oxidative stress and subsequent cytotoxicity in human pancreatic cancer cells, then the results of this proposed research program will provide a foundation for the rational design of a novel combined modality cancer therapy.
John Dagle, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Biochemistry
  • Epidemiology
Genetic factors associated with prematurity and the complications of preterm birth.
Brandon Davies, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
The primary focus of my laboratory is on the regulation of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism and fatty acid partitioning. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the primary enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing lipoprotein triglycerides for the delivery of fatty acids to tissues. To become functional LPL must be trafficked across endothelial cells. My current research program is investigating how this trafficking, and subsequent LPL-mediated triglyceride clearance, is regulated and how it may become misregulated in metabolic disease.
Sanjana Dayal, PhD, FAHA
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
Delineating mechanisms of thrombosis associated with cardiovascular risk factors and cancer
Kris DeMali, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Dermatology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
A major focus of the work in my lab is to understand cellular mechanisms involved in assembly and maintenance of cell-cell adhesions by examining the function and regulation of proteins recruited to the cytoplasmic face of cadherins. Miranda Schene
David Dick, PhD
  • Radiology
  • Cancer Biology
Production of radioisotopes for use in positron emission tomography (PET); design and implementation of radiosynthetic methods for PET radiotracers.
Rebecca Dodd, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The Dodd lab studies soft-tissue sarcomas, a type of cancer that develops in connective tissue such as muscle, nerves, fat, or tendons. Specific areas of research include 1) the genetics of sarcoma, 2) the tumor microenvironment, 3) preclinical platform applications, and 4) novel genome editing tools. Wade Gutierrez
Adam Dupuy, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Pathology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
The goal of my current research is to understand the role that somatic mutation plays in all aspects of tumor biology. Much of our work has made use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system to engineer mouse cancer models in which somatic mutations are generated by transposon insertions. The current work in my laboratory focuses on the genetics of hepatocellular carcinoma and T-cell leukemia. Charlotte Feddersen
Daniel Eberl, PhD
  • Biology
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
  • Neuroscience
  • Genetics
Auditory systems allow organisms to capitalize on information from sounds in the environment. We are interested in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of how organisms detect sound, and how they use the information from sounds to direct their behavior. We use Drosophila as a model system to examine these processes.
Craig Ellermeier, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
Work in the Ellermeier Lab focuses on how Gram-positive bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. Our work is focused on the opportunistic human pathogen Clostridium difficile and the model organism Bacillus subtilis. We are interested in understanding how cells respond to changes in their environment by altering gene expression.
David Elliott, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology-Hepatology
Dr. Elliott's research interest focuses on the mechanisms that control inflammatory reactions in the mucosa. In the laboratory, he studies how helminths influence the immune system to suppress inflammation. In the clinic, he cares for patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases of the stomach and intestine.
John Engelhardt, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Biology
Research in the Engelhardt laboratory focuses on: 1) lung molecular and cellular biology as it relates to the pathogenesis and treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, 2) the development of viral vector for gene therapy and gene editing, 3) pathogenesis cystic fibrosis related diabetes, and 4) the study of airway stem cell niches, the regulatory mechanisms that control stem cell proliferation and repair in the airway, and the development of cell-based therapies for CF using stem cells.
Polly Ferguson, MD
  • Pediatrics
  • Pediatrics - Rheumatology
Genetic Aspects of Inflammatory Disorders, current research projects focus on determining the genetic basis of Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, SAPHO Syndrome and Lupus.
John Fingert, MD, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
My laboratory is currently investigating the mechanisms by which defects in genes in the autophagy pathway (TBK1, OPTN, and others) lead to normal tension glaucoma using transgenic mice, induced pluripotent stem cells, and other patient-based studies. Other major projects include genetic studies of pigmentary glaucoma, exfoliative glaucoma, dominant optic atrophy, and studies of the genetic basis of quantitative features of glaucoma (eye pressure, corneal thickness, and optic nerve cupping). Carly van der Heide
Rory Fisher, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Current projects include characterizing novel signaling actions of RGS proteins, transgene technologies to probe physiological roles of RGS proteins and cloning and characterizing undiscovered forms of RGS6 we have identified.
C. Andrew Frank, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Homeostasis is a robust form of regulation that allows a system to maintain a constant output despite external perturbations. In the nervous system, homeostasis plays a critical role in regulating neuronal and synaptic activity. Yet the molecular basis of this form of neural plasticity is generally unknown. We address this problem using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. The overall goal is to define conserved signaling mechanisms that direct synapses to maintain stable properties, like excitation levels.
Bernd Fritzsch, PhD
  • Biology
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
  • Neuroscience
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Ongoing research in the Fritzsch laboratory focuses on four main themes: 1) Molecular basis of ear development; 2) Molecular basis of inner efferent and brainstem motoneuron formation; 3) Molecular basis of hair cell proliferation, maintenance & regeneration; 4) Improving multicolor dye tracing techniques.
Ernesto Fuentes, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Research in my laboratory focuses on important problems in signal transduction and potentially gain insight into the mechanisms governing signal transduction in eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems. The major goal is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate signal transduction.
Joel Geerling, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
Identifying and deciphering previously unknown connections between neurons in the brainstem and other subcortical brain region Fillan Grady
Pamela Geyer, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
The Geyer laboratory is interested in understanding mechanisms involved in genome organization and gene regulation. Studies include determination of the molecular mechanisms used by insulators to prevent interactions between enhancers, silencers and promoters and the identification of novel insulators.
Paloma Giangrande, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
Dr. Giangrande's research interests include developing RNA-based therapeutics to modulate cellular pathways underlying pathological cell proliferation in the setting of cancer and cardiovascular disease. One area of Dr. Giangrande’s lab focuses on selecting RNA aptamers to receptors expressed on the surface of target-cells with SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment). A second area of interest of the Giangrande lab is optimization of aptamer-siRNA technology.
Saket Girotra, MBBS, MS
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
Epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases and understanding hospital-level variation in patient outcomes
Prabhat Goswami, PhD
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
Role of intracellular redox-state plays in regulating the mammalian cell cycle, and establishing a link between ROS-signaling and other aspects of intracellular signaling networks.
Steven Green, PhD
  • Biology
  • Otolaryngology
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
We study molecular and cellular mechanisms by which neuronal survival, neurite growth, and synaptogenesis are regulated by neural activity or membrane depolarization. For studies of survival, we principally use spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea.
Jeremy Greenlee, MD
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience
I study human language, audiovisual, and vocalization physiology using electrophysiological recordings from human subjects undergoing surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy. Ryan Kelley
Chad Grueter, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
Through a combination of pharmacological and genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies in mice, we found the heart is capable of regulating whole body metabolism through a mechanism that is governed by MED13 and miR-208a. We primarily utilize mutant mouse models to study the proteomic, molecular, bioinformatic and biochemical methods to study the molecular signaling events controlling cardiac transcriptional response to stress.
Isabella Grumbach, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The Grumbach lab studies Calcium- and reactive oxygen species-dependent pathways in smooth muscle and endothelium that contribute to vascular wall disease, for example in hypertension, atherosclerosis and after mechanical or chemical injury.
C. Allan Guymon, PhD
  • Chemical & Biochemical Engineering
Current research projects: 1) Photopolymerization of Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline Systems; 2) Improving 3D Photocured Systems; 3) Improving Neural Interfaces by Directing Nerve Growth with Photopolymerized Micropatterns; 4) Directed Network Structure Through Controlled Radical Photopolymerization; 5) Nano/MicroStructured Materials Obtained Using Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation (PhIPS) Ryan Horne
Donna Hammond, PhD
  • Anesthesia
  • Pharmacology
  • Neuroscience
  • Cancer Biology
We are particularly interested in the role that inhibitory neurotransmitters, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or the endogenous opioid peptides, play in the modulation of nociceptive sensitivity at the level of the spinal cord and brainstem. Our results indicate that persistent pain can lead to long-term changes in the pharmacology and physiology of both the afferent pathways that convey pain, as well as the efferent pathways that suppress pain.
Marlan Hansen, MD
  • Otolaryngology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Cancer Biology
Auditory neurobiology and response of the auditory nerve to injury, its regenerative capacity, and methods to ameliorate damage using in vitro and in vivo animal models and human subjects. Joseph Vecchi
N. Charles Harata, MD, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neuroscience
The study of synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. In one project, we are evaluating the fundamental parameters of neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic site. In another project, we are elucidating the cellular pathophysiology of a movement disorder dystonia.
John Harty, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Pathology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Current projects in the lab: Basic immunology and imaging of CD8 T cell immunity to liver-stage malaria; CD4 T cell and antibody mediated immunity to blood-stage malaria; Basic immunology and imaging of cerebral malaria; Tissue resident memory CD8 T cell dynamics and protection from influenza virus infection of the lung; Impact of repetitive influenza exposure on generation and persistence of protective CD8 T cells; Regulating memory CD8 T cell differentiation through inflammatory cytokines. Mitchell LeFebvre
Sailesh Harwani, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
My group's research focuses on the interaction between the nervous system and the immune system/inflammation in hypertension. We are investigating the role of the “neuro-immune axis” in cardiovascular disease and specifically hypertension.
Michael Henry, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Pathology
  • Urology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Cancer Biology
My laboratory seeks to understand the molecular and cellular basis of prostate cancer progression and metastasis in order to develop new methods for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Current efforts are focused on the role of a cell-matrix receptor dystroglycan and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in this process.
Eric Hoffman, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
In addition to continuing basic physiologic research of the lung, Dr. Hoffman has begun to apply single and multi-spectral multidetector row spiral CT imaging methodology to objectively follow human lung pathology and pathophysiology with a particular emphasis on inflammatory lung diseases.
Jon Houtman, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
T cell activation is critical for the ability of the human immune system to properly fight an infection by a pathogen. However, inappropriate or aberrant T cell induction drives the initiation and progression of numerous human diseases, including T cell lymphoma/leukemia, human malignancies, autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, and transplant rejection. The goal of my laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanism of the formation of the multiprotein signaling complexes that occur after TCR and to investigate the ability of therapeutic agents to alter TCR signaling. Aline Sandouk
Chou-Long Huang, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Nephrology
  • Molecular Medicine
Epithelial ion transport in physiology and kidney disease.
Kaikobad Irani, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
The lab seeks to understand fundamental mechanisms operative in cardiovascular health and disease. Although vascular wall biology is a focus of the lab, we also have an interest in, and have worked on, questions relating to DNA repair, cancer biology, hemostasis and platelet biology, ischemic injury, myocardial biology, and cardiac ion channel function.
Ali Jabbari, MD, PhD
  • Dermatology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
The Jabbari lab is focused on two areas of research: 1) We aim to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for loss of immune privilege and autoimmune attack of the hair follicle in alopecia areata in order to identify novel therapeutic targets and uncover themes consistent across autoimmune diseases in humans. 2) We are working to identify the genetic and molecular perturbations among the different forms of CTCL (cutaneous T cell lymphomas) in order to better match patients with the treatment course that will be most effective.
Peter Kaboli, MD, MS, FACP, FHM
  • Internal Medicine
  • Epidemiology
Improving health care for veterans, in depth analysis of various aspects of the Veterans Health Administration Health System
Nitin Karandikar, MD, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The goal of our research is to understand immune interactions that underlie the pathogenesis and regulation of immune-based diseases. A major focus of the laboratory is the immune-mediated, demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis (MS).
Toshihiro Kitamoto, PhD
  • Anesthesia
  • Pharmacology
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
Using Drosophila genetics to elucidate fundamental mechanisms underlying the control complex behaviors or brain functions, such as learning and memory, sleep and mood.
Julia Klesney-Tait, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
2019 Summer Research Rotation Mentor Jayden Bowen
Damian Krysan, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
The Krysan lab is interested in understanding how pathogenic fungi cause disease; how the host defends itself against these fungal pathogens; and how to develop new therapies for human fungal diseases.
Anne Kwitek, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics
Dr. Kwitek is an animal and human geneticist whose research revolves around dissecting the genetic components of complex disease in rat and human, with an emphasis on hypertension, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome.
Amy Lee, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Otolaryngology
  • Neuroscience
Our research centers on voltage-gated (Cav) Ca2+ channels and their roles in the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Joseph Vecchi
Gloria Lee, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory investigates the structure and function of the neuronal cytoskeleton and its role in neurodegenerative diseases Tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is critical for neuronal development Max Liu
Kevin Legge, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
My laboratory is focused upon determining the contribution of dendritic cells (DC) to both the initiation and regulation the adaptive immunity to pulmonary pathogens, in particular influenza virus. Overall the goals of our studies are to determine which DC-derived factors and interactions are necessary to induce protective immunity during pathogen infections of the lungs.
Hans-Joachim Lehmler, PhD
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
  • Human Toxicology
Dr. Lehmler studies the disposition and metabolism of chiral environmental contaminants, toxicity of perfluorinated surfactants, interaction of fluorinated materials with biological lipid assemblies, synthesis of halogenated POPs and their metabolites.
Steven Lentz, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Endothelial function in vascular diseases and tissue injury. Current areas of investigation include vascular function in hyperhomocysteinemia and atherosclerosis.
Kimberly Leslie, MD
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
Molecular biology of hormone action and hormone receptors in reproductive tissues; response to steroid stimulation and the phenotypic and genomic mechanisms in endometrial cancer.
Scott Lieberman, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics
  • Immunology Graduate Program
The goal of our research is to understand the mechanisms of immune dysregulation that lead to organ-specific autoimmunity with a focus on Sjögren syndrome (lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity).
Dominique Limoli, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
2019 Summer Research Rotation Mentor
Fang Lin, MD, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
The goal of our laboratory's research is to understand the genetic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that control heart morphogenesis using zebrafish as a model system. We particularly are interested in understanding 1) how two populations of myocardial precursors migrate towards to the embryonic midline to form primitive heart tube, the foundation for subsequent cardiac morphogenesis and 2) how internal organs including heart are asymmetrically placed along the left-right body axis.
Brian Link, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
2019 Summer Rotation Research Mentor Madi Wahlen
Barry London, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Genetics
My laboratory studies the molecular and genetic basis of sudden cardiac death in animal models, human families with inherited rhythm disorders, and populations at increased risk for sudden death. Pioneering studies in my laboratory engineered the first mouse models of long QT syndrome. Daniel Matasic, Alex Greiner
Gabriele Ludewig, PhD
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Ludewig’s recent emphasis has been on understanding the carcinogenic risk from lower chlorinated biphenyls, i.e. airborne PCBs, like those found in older buildings, schools, and the air of metropolitan areas. She has led an effort to study the metabolites of airborne PCBs and to identify their individual geno-toxicities.
Charles Lynch, MD, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Pathology
  • Cancer Biology
Population-based research that involves a cancer surveillance program (Iowa Cancer Registry) and cancer epidemiology, cancer pathology, and environmental epidemiology.
Vinit Mahajan, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
Currently at Stanford. Development of personalized medicine for eye diseases through translation of our discoveries in proteomics, genomics, and phenomics in humans, mice and tissue culture models. Gabriel Velez, Marcus Toral
John Manak, PhD
  • Biology
  • Pediatrics
  • Informatics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
  • Neuroscience
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Biology
The overarching goal of my research laboratory is to elucidate the genetic basis of several human diseases/disorders either by modeling the disease in fruit flies, or by analyzing genetic variation in patient samples. We use a variety of cutting edge genomics methodologies, including arrayCGH and exome sequencing, to identify etiologic mutations in humans for disorders such as cleft lip and palate, renal agenesis, spina bifida, and branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome.
Ashutosh Mangalam, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The major goal of my research is to develop better treatment options to cure multiple sclerosis (MS), by: i) utilizing transgenic mice expressing MS susceptible and resistant HLA class II molecules (HLA transgenic mice) to understand the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis; ii) to understand the role of gut microbiome and metabolome in the etiopathogenesis of MS; and iii) test therapeutic efficacy of human gut derived bacteria as drug (BRUG) in animal models of MS.
Wendy Maury, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
The goal of our research is to understand interactions between enveloped viruses and the host. We currently focus on two main areas of research: enveloped virus entry and innate host immune responses to virus infection. Using filoviruses and flaviviruses, we have identified a novel set of cell surface receptors and continue to explore the cellular biology of these interactions as well as the pathological consequences. Kai Rogers
Paul McCray, MD
  • Pediatrics - Pulmonary Allergy & Immunology
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Genetics
  • Human Toxicology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
Our research interests include airway epithelial cell biology and the pathogenesis and treatment of the recessive disease cystic fibrosis. We are using large scale gene expression and genomics approaches to study epithelial cell mRNA and microRNA gene networks regulating biologic processes involved in health and disease. Laura Marquez Loza
James McNamara, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
My research is primarily focused on nucleic acid-based diagnostic technologies for infectious diseases. With a simple quenched fluorescent oligonucleotide probe format, my research group can rapidly and selectively detect the presence of a variety of bacterial pathogens via the unique properties of their nucleases.
Jacob Michaelson, PhD
  • Psychiatry - Computational & Molecular Psychiatry Division
  • Communication Sciences & Disorders
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Genetics
We are interested in the use of computing to improve the understanding, diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental conditions. 1) Genetics & comorbidities in Autism, 2) Genetics of language impairment, 3) Predictions of top autism gene candidates, 4) Genetics of twice-exceptionality. Leo Brueggeman
Nicholas Mohr, MD, MS
  • Anesthesia
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Epidemiology
The effect of telemedicine in emergency response and door-to-provider time. Morgan Bobb Swanson
Craig Morita, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Immunology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Morita's lab work currently focuses on antigen recognition by γδ T cells, purification of nonpeptide antigens recognized by T cells, T cell-mediated immunity to infection, development, chemotaxis, and functions of memory γδ T cells, CD1 presentation of glycolipids to T Cells, the role of γδ T cells in cancer immunotherapy, and boosting γδ T cell bridge immunity in tularemia.
Scott Moye-Rowley, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory has two primary research interests centered on transcriptional control of gene expression. The first involves the study of the function of a yeast transcriptional regulatory protein; the second area of investigation concerns the ability of particular mutant strains of yeast to simultaneously acquire resistance to several cytotoxic drugs with unrelated actions.
Robert Mullins, MS, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
Biology and pathology of the choroidal microvasculature in aging and macular disease; Mechanisms involved in the development of drusen; Structural and compositional changes in Bruch's membrane in aging and disease, and their effects on ocular physiology; Animal and in vitro models of age-related macular degeneration; Cell biology of inherited retinal diseases. Drew Voigt, Nathaniel Mullin
Jeffrey Murray, MD
  • Pediatric Dentistry
  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics - Neonatology
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Biology
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
Current projects include strategies to identify and characterize genes and environmental components in complex human disorders. We focus on conditions that affect infants and children including a common birth defect- cleft lip and palate, prematurity and two traits of young children- myopia and language development.
Catherine Musselman, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Cancer Biology
My lab is interested in deciphering mechanisms of chromatin structure modulation and how misregulation of these pathways is associated with disease. Specifically, our goal is to elucidate, on the molecular level, the details of how cofactors target nucleosomes, especially in response to histone modification, and how this leads to the regulation of genes.
Nandakumar Narayanan, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience
The specific problem we are interested is cognitive dysfunction in Parkinsons disease. Our current research focuses on the influence of dopamine on prefrontal networks controlling cognitive behaviors such as timing and performance monitoring.
Peggy Nopoulos, MD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Pediatrics
  • Neuroscience
Our lab studies the structure and function of the brain using imaging tools such as MRI and cognitive / behavioral assessment. In the healthy brain we study topics such as brain development over the lifespan, gender differences and social cognition. Disease populations that we work with include patients with schizophrenia, Huntington's Disease, and children with clefts of the lip/palate. Alexander Tereshchenko
Andrew Norris, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics - Endocrinology & Diabetes
  • Biochemistry
  • Informatics
Our work is currently focused on three questions. (1) How does fetal over- or under-exposure to macronutrients incite poor metabolism? (2) How does cystic fibrosis cause diabetes? (3) How does direct action on skeletal muscle of the thiazolidinediones and their target, the transcription factor PPARgamma, help treat diabetes?
Jacob Oleson, PhD
  • Biostatistics
Research interests include: Cochlear implant research; Speech and language learning; Infectious disease modeling; Air quality mapping; Small area estimation. Andres Dajles
Jane Paulsen, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychological & Brain Sciences
  • Neuroscience
Topics of current interest include subtypes of Alzheimer's disease, preclinical cognitive deficits associated with gene-carriers of Huntington's disease and clinical/imaging correlates of cognitive measures. Functional MR and PET are used to examine frontal-striatal circuitry dysfunction in these disorders.
Corinne Peek-Asa, PhD
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
  • Epidemiology
Dr. Peek-Asa has conducted research in the areas of global road traffic safety, interpersonal violence, workplace violence, residential fire injuries, poisoning, and acute care. Her work has included surveillance; risk factor identification; design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention programs; design and evaluation of safety policy; and, translation and dissemination methods.
Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Pediatrics
  • Neuroscience
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
My laboratory has been interested in the pathogenesis of murine coronavirus infections for several years. Now, we also study three respiratory human coronavirus infections: SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)-coronavirus, Middle East Respiratory syndrome (MERS)-coronavirus, human coronavirus-OC43 and human coronavirus-NL63. Matthew Grunewald
Christine Petersen, DVM, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Investigation of host-pathogen interaction between the murine or canine immune system and Leishmania species; Characterization of key signaling events required to induce clearance of disease vs. chronicity; Understanding of processing of and immune responses to carbohydrates; Development of diagnostics and epidemiological studies of Brucella canis; Prevention of Infectious Diseases in kennel/animal shelter settings; Zoonotic diseases.
Andrew Pieper, MD, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Dr. Andrew Pieper has moved on to the Harrington Discovery Institute at the University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH Rachel Genova
Robert Piper, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory is interested in how proteins are degraded in lysosomes. Our overall goal is to understand the protein machinery common in all cell types that controls the delivery of membrane proteins to the lysosome.
Philip Polgreen, MD, MPH
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology
  • Informatics
Our research involves the use of computational tools to model, simulate, visualize and, in general, understand the spread of disease. Our goal is to inform public and hospital policy decisions with respect to disease surveillance, disease prevention measures, and outbreak containment.
Matthew Potthoff, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
Liver-derived hormones signal nutrient availability to other tissues and control substrate utilization to maintain energy balance. My lab is interested in unraveling these hepatic pathways that govern systemic energy balance by focusing on known and novel hepatokines. Sheps King-McAlpin
Veena Prahlad, PhD
  • Biology
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
  • Integrated Biology Graduate Program (iBio)
Using the models organism, C. elegans we investigate 1) how the sensory perception of suboptimal environmental conditions, or stress, is signaled by the nervous system; 2) how the signals are transmitted to non-neuronal cells; 3) how the information is interpreted by non-neuronal cells to to regulate protein folding and HSP gene.
David Price, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
The Price Lab is committed to defining the basic mechanisms that regulate the elongation phase of transcription by RNA polymerase II. We apply both biochemical, molecular, and global bioinformatics tools to understand how elongation is controlled. Most of our current work is focused on human cells and the viruses that infect them.
Miles Pufall, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Our immediate goals are to identify: all signals that have an impact on glucocorticoid induced cell death; GR regulated genes that induce cell death; and GR binding sites associated with these genes. In addition, we are elucidating how both drugs and DNA sequence change the structure of GR at these crucial genes.
Dawn Quelle, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Pathology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Our goal is to define the critical regulators of ARF signaling and determine their significance to tumor suppression using molecular approaches and in vivo models of cancer. In so doing, we will advance our fundamental understanding of ARF-mediated tumor suppression and also identify novel regulators of growth (both positive and negative) whose characterization will likely contribute to new paradigms of carcinogenesis.
Kamal Rahmouni, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
There are currently several ongoing studies aimed at elucidating the intracellular pathways involved in the central nervous system control of energy homeostasis and autonomic cardiovascular function by insulin and adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin. Specifically, we are focused at understanding the exact role of the different downstream pathways associated with the insulin and leptin receptors in the regulation of the physiological cues.
Joseph Reinhardt, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology
  • Informatics
Structural and functional evaluation of the normal and abnormal lung; Lung tissue functional assessment to guide radiation therapy; Analysis of breathing sounds to predict sputum accumulation during mechanical ventilation; Segmentation, measurement, and network analysis of the retinal vasculature; Pediatric airway segmentation, measurement, and shape modeling.
George Richerson, MD, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Molecular Medicine
Sudden death in epilepsy (SUDEP) and infants (SIDS), GABA mechanisms in epilepsy, Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, Control of breathing, Sleep, Serotonin, Brainstem mechanisms.
Larry Robertson, PhD, MPH
  • Occupational & Environmental Health
  • Human Toxicology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Identification of targets and mechanisms of toxicity that will form a basis for our understanding of PCBs risks to human health and their amelioration. Special emphasis is given to school air PCBs.
Jennifer Robinson, MD, MPH
  • Epidemiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Informatics
Appropriate use of pharmacologic therapies for cardiovascular prevention; Cardiovascular prevention in special populations, with a focus on aging and women; Clinical trials of atherosclerosis modifying agents.
Paul Romitti, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Biostatistics
  • Cancer Biology
Behavioral (e.g., alcohol and tobacco) and environmental (e.g., pesticides) epidemiology of congenital and inherited disorders; Molecular genetics of congenital and inherited disorders; Surveillance for congenital and inherited disorders.
No Rotation,
  • No Rotation
Peter Rubenstein, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics
Our laboratory investigates the biochemistry of actin and the actin binding proteins that modulate its function within the cell. In particular, we are interested in the conformational changes in actin necessary for its polymerization, the forces that stabilize actin monomers within the actin filament, and the manner in which actin filament modulating proteins such as cofilin, Arp2/3 complex and profilin carry out their roles.
Andrew Russo, PhD
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Neurology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
My research interest is the molecular basis of a migraine. We have initiated translational studies to examine the unexpectedly high frequency of migraine and photophobia in veterans with mild TBI. Our overall goals are to develop effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for migraine and post-traumatic headaches.
Thomas Rutkowski, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Our laboratory seeks to understand a fundamental but very poorly understood question in biology: When a cell encounters stress (i.e., anything that perturbs normal cellular function), how does it decide whether to adapt to the stress or die? By tackling this question, we hope to better understand diseases of stress, including neurodegeneration, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and others, and even normal cellular development and function.
Punam Saha, PhD
  • Radiology
  • Electrical & Computer Engineering
Tensor scale-based image analysis, digital topology and geometry, fuzzy distance transform, virtual bone biopsy.
Aliasger Salem, BSc, BA, PhD
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Sciences & Experimental Therapeutics Dept (PSET)
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutics & Translational Therapeutics Division (PSET - PTT)
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Salem's research interests are primarily focused on self-assembling systems, the rational design of novel drug and gene delivery systems and on the development of sophisticated scaffolds for tissue-specific regeneration.
Edward Sander, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical & Biochemical Engineering
3D Biomimetic In Vitro Systems; Wound Healing, Tissue Engineering, and Cell Matrix Interactions; Mechanobiology and Soft Tissue Mechanics; Multi-scale Computational Modeling; Drug Delivery; Synthetic Biology
Mark Santillan, MD, PhD
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Molecular Medicine
The Santillan lab is particularly interested in the relationship between maternal health during pregnancy and the short and long-term health effects to the mother and child. Specifically, our current work focuses on the early mechanisms involved in the development of preeclampsia, including immunological and vascular function changes during pregnancy. --- 2019 Summer Rotation Mentor Hannah Van Ert
Todd Scheetz, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioinformatics & Computational Biology
  • Genetics
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
  • Electrical & Computer Engineering
A major focus of my lab is the utilization and analysis of next-generation sequencing technology. We have identified two novel disease-causing genes to date, and are currently pursing validation in several additional families. Drew Voigt
Patrick Schlievert, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Research in my laboratory studies superantigen and cytolysin exotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, as immune system modulators, evaluating their roles in serious human illnesses, including pneumonia and infective endocarditis, atopic dermatitis, and diabetes mellitus.
Michael Schnieders, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Informatics
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Biology
Our lab is focused on molecular biophysics theory and high performance computational algorithms that are needed to reduce the time and cost of engineering drugs and organic biomaterials. A complementary goal is to help open the door to personalized medicine by developing tools to map genetic information onto molecular phenotypes.
Michael Schultz, PhD
  • Radiology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Pediatrics
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Chemistry
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Schultz’s lab focuses on tumor cell biology, radiation biology, peptide based ligand development, and radiochemistry for the development of image-guided radionuclide based therapies for cancer.
Marin Schweizer, PhD
  • Internal Medicine
  • Epidemiology
Her research focuses on prevention and treatment of healthcare-associated infections, specifically S. aureus infections and surgical site infections; nasal decolonization and other interventions to prevent surgical site infections; molecular epidemiology of S. aureus; meta-analyses of these topics; and analyses of large databases to evaluate healthcare-associated infections.
Daniel Sewell, PhD
  • Biostatistics
His primary area of research is in statistical models and inference for network data, and in particular the statistical analysis of dynamic social networks. He has also contributed to other subfields of statistics, such as clustering and particle filtering, and holds interest in broad research topic areas such as Bayesian statistics and statistical computation. He has worked collaboratively in the areas of infectious disease, exposure assessment, physical activity accelerometry data, analysis of large health claims databases, and in the area of healthcare team communication Elliot Burghardt
Val Sheffield, MD, PhD
  • Pediatrics - Medical Genetics & Genomics
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Neuroscience
Complex genetic disorders currently under investigation in the laboratory include hypertension, obesity, congenital heart disease and autism. In addition, we have worked on developing and improving techniques for disease mapping, positional cloning, and mutation detection. We have also had an active role in the human genome project and the rat genome project. Sunny Huang, Thomas Pak
Jessica Sieren, PhD
  • Radiology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cancer Biology
Current areas of focus include, dynamic perfusion computed tomography for lung nodule characterization and for early response to treatment monitoring, lobar co-localization between lung disease and cancer, and animal models for lung cancer evaluation and drug development.
Andrean Simons-Burnett, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Our laboratory seeks to enhance the treatment of head and neck cancer by improving radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimens for recurrent and metastatic disease. We focus in particular on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the increasing use of EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Our overall goals are to increase the anti-tumor efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in head and neck tumors, and identify mechanisms of resistance to EGFR-based chemotherapy.
Kathleen Sluka, PhD
  • Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
Dr. Sluka's laboratory studies the peripheral and central mechanisms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, and non-pharmacological treatment for chronic pain. Our overall goals are to improve the management of pain for people with a variety of musculoskeletal pain conditions by discovering the underlying mechanisms that lead to the development of chronic pain, discovering new therapies for pain management, and improving the use of currently available treatment for pain.
Richard Smith, MD
  • Otolaryngology
  • Pediatrics
  • Internal Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Informatics
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
My laboratory focuses on inherited hearing impairment and complement-related renal diseases like membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (MPGN II; also known as Dense Deposit Disease) and atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome. Inherited hearing impairment can occur with other co-inherited clinical features to form a recognized phenotype (syndromic hearing loss) or appear in isolation (non-syndromic hearing loss). We are using RNAi to develop novel methods to correct hearing loss. Joseph Chin
Linda Snetselaar, RD, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Nutritional epidemiology, nutritional intervention clinical trials;
Peter Snyder, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Dr. Snyder's clinical interest is general cardiology. His research interest is understanding function and regulation of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Defects in those channels cause hypertension and contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.
Maria Spies, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
We study DNA repair at the most fundamental level by first deconstructing the macromolecular ensembles orchestrating distinct DNA repair events down to the level of individual proteins. By combining physical and single-molecule biochemistry, we then investigate molecular mechanisms of the key players in these DNA repair pathways and how other protein partners and posttranslational modifications affect their action.
Ashley Spies, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Sciences & Experimental Therapeutics Dept (PSET)
  • Pharmacy - Medicinal & Natural Products Chemistry Division (PSET - MNPC)
Our research group investigates the fundamental properties of protein-ligand interactions, from a physical and chemical perspective. Our primary focus is on pharmaceutically relevant enzymes.
Douglas Spitz, PhD
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Cancer Biology
Nitric Oxide Toxicology, Glucose Deprivation-Induced Cytotoxicity in Human Tumor Cells Kelly Hubert
Jack Stapleton, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Epidemiology and effects of co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV), human GB virus type C (HGBV - also called hepatitis G virus), and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Hanna Stevens, MD, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Human Toxicology
Her research seeks to understand molecular and cellular aspects of early brain development and their relevance to psychiatric disorders. Her work is particularly focused on understanding how prenatal stress, environmental exposures and genes that play a role in early development have an impact on childhood behavior and act as risk factors for multiple psychiatric disorders.
David Stoltz, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
Dr. Stoltz's research focuses on the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis related airway disease with a particular emphasis on studying airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, the role of paraoxonases (PONs) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing regulation, mucociliary clearance, and advanced airway imaging modalities and analysis.
Edwin Stone, MD, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Genetics
  • Informatics
  • Neuroscience
Dr. Stone is interested in finding and characterizing genes that are involved in three classes of human eye disease: macular degeneration, glaucoma, and heritable photoreceptor degeneration. Joseph Giacalone, Matthew Miller
Stefan Strack, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Pathology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
My laboratory is interested in the roles of one of the major serine/threonine phosphatases, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in normal and pathological brain function.
Munir Tanas, MD
  • Pathology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Our lab studies the role of the Hippo pathway in sarcomas. Our current projects focus on: Mechanisms of oncogene activation; Upstream signal transduction mechanisms; Epigenetics; Tumorigenesis and metastasis; Identification of new therapeutic drugs.
Eric Taylor, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
The Taylor Lab investigates the molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial function and their relationship to disease. We employ diverse experimental models as necessary to solve fundamental problems in metabolism. We have specific expertise in molecular genetics and metabolomics. We have ongoing projects on diabetes, cancer, and neuroscience. Sean Tompkins, Daniel Pape
Michael Tomasson, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
Understanding development of multiple myeloma and leukemia
Tina Tootle, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
In the Tootle Lab, we believe that if we want to target a particular action of prostaglandins, such as promoting heart health or preventing cancer, then we need to define the downstream targets of the specific prostaglandin signaling cascade that regulates those actions. To achieve this goal, we use the simple, yet elegant, system of Drosophila (fruit fly) genetics.
Jim Torner, PhD
  • Epidemiology
  • Informatics
Dr. Torner has conducted research in clinical trials, women’s health and disability related to injuries. He has been teaching, designing and conducting clinical trials for four decades. He has directed the Iowa Trauma Registry and has evaluated effective triage and critical care.
Daniel Tranel, PhD
  • Neurology
  • Psychological & Brain Sciences
  • Neuroscience
  • Informatics
Dr. Tranel's research deals with the following topics: visual recognition; face recognition; verbal and nonverbal learning and retrieval; nonconscious cognitive processing; acquired disorders of social conduct; emotional processing; psychophysiology. The work is aimed at understanding brain-behavior relationships in humans, at systems level.
Budd Tucker, PhD
  • Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
Dr. Tucker’s Laboratory is focused on combining state-of-the-art patient-specific stem cell, gene therapeutic and human retinal engineering technologies to study and treat inherited retinal degenerative blindness. Joseph Giacalone, Matthew Miller
Yuriy Usachev, PhD
  • Pharmacology
  • Anesthesia
  • Neuroscience
Dr. Usachev's lab uses a multidisciplinary approach (electrophysiology, confocal microscopy, brain slice recordings, animal models of diabetes and stroke) to better understand regulatory mechanisms and function of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in neurons, its dependence on the MFF status, and the role of mitochondrial Ca2+ and MFF in protecting neurons from glutamate toxicity as well as hyperglycemia-induced axonal degeneration.
Steve Varga, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Pathology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
My laboratory is interested in studying the contribution of virus-specific T lymphocytes to enhanced disease and immunopathology during virus infection. Our laboratory studies the mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The overall goal of our studies is to gain a better understanding of the immune determinants that lead to protection versus immunopathology so that safer and more effective vaccines can be developed in the future.
Yatin Vyas, MD, MBBS
  • Pediatrics - Heme/Onc
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
My laboratory research program focuses on explicating the molecular underpinnings of immune dysregulation and cancer development in children. Two broad components of our research program are: 1. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and immune dysregulation; 2. Investigating the Genome and Epigenome of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).
Robert Wallace, MD
  • Epidemiology
  • Cancer Biology
Epidemiology of aging, Cancer epidemiology, disabling illnesses of older persons including arthritis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and dementia.
Lori Wallrath, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Eukaryotic chromatin structure and gene expression; molecular mechanisms of gene silencing in Drosophila
M. Todd Washington, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Washington's laboratory studies the mechanisms by which mutations occur in eukaryotic cells. We use a variety of approaches including biochemical studies (ligand binding studies, enzyme activity assays), structural biology (X-ray crystallography, X-ray scattering), and cell-based techniques (yeast genetics, human tissue culture) to understand the mechanisms of non-classical DNA polymerases and various replication accessory factors involved in mutagenesis. Melissa Gildenberg
Daniel Weeks, PhD
  • Biochemistry
  • Pediatrics
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
We take advantage of the conservation of developmental control of embryogenesis among organisms, to study the function of genes involved in congenital defects in humans by doing experiments with the frog Xenopus laevis. Our most current studies look at how amyloids are used as part of normal development. The extracellular formation of amyloid particles is part of the pathogenesis that accompanies devastating diseases like Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease.
Ron Weigel, MD, PhD
  • Surgery
  • Biochemistry
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
  • Cancer Biology
The Weigel laboratory has had a long-standing interest in determining mechanisms of hormone response in breast cancer. Our work has identified transcriptional mechanisms that regulate the expression of estrogen receptor - alpha in breast carcinomas. Other areas of investigation have sought to identify genes that are related to hormone response and additional mechanisms of gene regulation that are responsive to estrogen.
George Weiner, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Pharmacy - Pharmaceutical Sciences & Experimental Therapeutics Dept (PSET)
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Informatics
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Weiner’s research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies, and on development of novel approaches to immunotherapy of lymphoma. Shakoora Sabree
Jerrold Weiss, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Human Toxicology
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
Role and regulation of mammalian innate immune recognition systems (focus: Gram-negative bacteria and endotoxin).
Michael Welsh, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Informatics
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
The Welsh laboratory emphasizes research in two main areas. The first is understanding the biology of cystic fibrosis, and developing new treatments. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the CFTR anion channel. Welsh and his colleagues are learning how the CFTR anion channel is regulated and how mutations disrupt its function. They also focus on the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis lung disease, learning how the loss of CFTR causes the bacterial airway infections and inflammation that destroy the lung. Andrew Kalenkiewicz
John Wemmie, MD, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurosurgery
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular Physiology & Biophysics
We recently found that the Acid Sensing Ion Channel, ASIC contributes to synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Our current research focuses on identifying the mechanism for ASIC activation in vivo, understanding the role of ASIC in synaptic plasticity, and establishing an uninterrupted link between ASIC channel activity and its behavioral impact. Margaret Fuller
Aislinn Williams, MD, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Neuroscience
The Williams lab is interested in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which genetic risk factors contribute to psychiatric disease from a developmental perspective. Our current projects focus on voltage-gated calcium channel genes, which have been linked to the risk of developing bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, and autism.
Virgina Willour, PhD
  • Psychiatry
  • Genetics
  • Neuroscience
The primary goal of our laboratory is to identify genetic and epigenetic risk factors for suicidal behavior. While there is evidence that this heritability is accounted for in part by a liability to mood disorder, other evidence suggests an independent heritable facet that may cut across multiple psychiatric disorders. We have begun an epigenetics project that involves assessing genome-wide methylation patterns in post-mortem brains of suicide completers and controls, with the goal of identifying differentially methylated candidate genes and regions associated with suicidal behavior.
Mary Wilson, MD
  • Internal Medicine
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Epidemiology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Dr. Wilson's research studies address the molecular, cellular and immunobiology of infection with the Leishmania species protozoa. Both human immunogenetic and parasite-encoded virulence factors lead to divergent disease manifestations. Dr. Wilson’s studies focus on the contributions of both host and parasite molecular characteristics that determine the outcome of leishmaniasis. Tiffany Borbon
Kristan Worthington, PhD
  • Biomedical Engineering
2019 Summer Rotation Mentor Qi Wang
Hai-Hui Xue, MD, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
  • Immunology Graduate Program
Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells to antigen responding T cells is accompanied by many stages of cell identity transition. Our lab aims to decode how key transcription factors coopts epigenetic mechanisms to maintain the cell identity and instigate the transitions during multiple biological processes.
Timothy Yahr, PhD
  • Microbiology & Immunology
  • Microbiology Graduate Program
The Yahr laboratory studies virulence properties of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) with particular interest in the type III secretion system (T3SS).
Ling Yang, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Our research aims to identify the molecular components of integration between organelle stress responses that are in play in obesity and diabetes at the cellular and organismic levels. We are specifically interested in identifying the physiological causes of defective hepatic autophagy in obesity, and defining the molecular mechanisms underlying how autophagy, as a catabolic pathway, controls energy homeostasis in obesity-associated metabolic disorders.
Charles Yeaman, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
  • Cell & Developmental Biology
Our long-term research objective is to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Research in our lab is focused primarily on defining the cellular mechanisms responsible for faithful and efficient targeting of exocytic transport vesicles to apical and basal-lateral plasma membrane domains and understanding how these exocytic pathways are first established during epithelial polarity development.
Samuel Young, PhD
  • Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Otolaryngology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Cell & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
How do synapses enable neuronal circuits to transmit a wide diversity of information? Outcomes from our work will define the molecular principles that govern how synaptic properties drive neuronal circuit output which underpins organism behavior. These molecular principles uncovered may reveal the underlying causes of neuronal circuit dysregulation which results in neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases and have the potential to give rise to new therapeutic treatments. Fillan Grady
Joseph Zabner, MD
  • Internal Medicine - Pulmonary
  • Molecular Medicine
Dr. Zabner's research interests are in gene transfer to human airway epithelia in particular to develop gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Dr. Zabner also has an interest in the fluid composition of the airway surface liquid, and how it affects innate immunity. His clinical interests are in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.
Fenghuang Zhan, MD, PhD
  • Internal Medicine - Heme/Onc
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cancer Biology
The long-term objective of Dr. Zhan’s lab is to develop novel therapies to overcome drug resistance and deplete cancer stem cells in myeloma. The major focus of research in Dr. Zhan laboratory is to define genes that make some myeloma cells resistant to chemotherapy and confirm their findings by in vitro (myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells) as well as in vivo (Mouse models).
Jian Zhang, MD
  • Pathology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology Graduate Program
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Jian Zhang studies molecular mechanisms of T cell activation and differentiation, and innate immune responses regulated by E3 ubiquitin ligases Cbl-b and Nedd4. Further understanding of these E3 ubiquitin ligases in innate and adaptive immunity will lead to the development of therapeutic invention for human diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, allergic asthma, and infectious diseases.
Weizhou Zhang, PhD
  • Pathology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Free Radical & Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
Dr. Zhang is currently at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine. Nicholas Borcherding